Mississippi Flyway

One of the first things waterfowl managers learned from their early waterfowl banding efforts was that waterfowl follow distinct, traditional migration corridors or flyways in their annual travels between breeding and wintering areas.
Since 1948, waterfowl have been managed by four administrative Flyways that are based on those migration paths: the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific Flyways. Each Flyway has a Flyway Council which is a formal organization composed of one member from each State and Province in that Flyway. Recently, Mexico has also provided representation at Pacific and Central Flyway meetings and discussions.
Each of the Flyways also has a Technical Committee composed of waterfowl biologists from the states and provinces in the Flyway. The Technical Committees meet several times annually to review the biological data from monitoring programs and provide recommendations to their respective Flyway Councils. Recommendations that are adopted by the Flyway Councils are presented to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Regulations Committee for consideration in the setting of waterfowl hunting regulations and management programs.
The Flyway Councils and Technical Committees are involved in many aspects of migratory game bird management, including development of recommendations for hunting regulations and assisting in research and habitat management activities. Some of the important waterfowl hunting regulations that are set each year, including season length and daily bag limits, are specific to these individual Flyways.

Contact Mississippi Flyway

Houston Havens
Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, & Parks
1505 Eastover Dr.
Jackson, Mississippi  39211
Phone: (662) 299-0273


Service Area

Statewide service provider in:
  • Mississippi

Office Locaters

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Related Success Stories for Mississippi Flyway

North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration
Contaminated ground water is cleaned with innovative technology and used to restore wetlands in a critical migratory waterfowl flyway.

Revegetation Project at Cape May National Wildlife Refuge
Study to evaluate cost-effective direct seeding techniques for restoring severely degraded site at former Coast Guard base into quality wildlife habitat along the Atlantic Flyway in New Jersey.