Texas Water Resources Institute

The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) and the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources (IRNR) work together to foster and communicate research and educational outreach programs focused on water and natural resources science and management issues in Texas and beyond.

First established in 1952, TWRI was designated as the water resources institute for the state of Texas in 1964 by the Texas Legislature and Texas Governor after Congress passed the Water Resources Research Act (WRRA) of 1964. The WRRA established water resources institutes in each state and provided funds for research on solving water issues. Today, TWRI is one of 54 institutes in the National Institute for Water Resources, which serves as the contact between individual institutes and the federal funding sponsor, U.S. Geological Survey.

Water Resources Research and Extension Collaborations
Working with university faculty and water resources professionals, TWRI helps address priority water resources issues in the state. We collaborate through joint projects with universities; federal, state and local governmental organizations; and numerous others, including engineering firms, commodity groups and environmental organizations.

Best Management Practices Evaluation
Our best management practices (BMPs) evaluation programs focus on research, demonstrations and educational projects that determine the best methods, processes or activities to improve and protect water quality. Many of the projects address agricultural and urban BMPs to reduce or prevent nonpoint source pollution; others focus on best practices to control or eliminate invasive species.

Watershed Assessment, Planning and Restoration
Our watershed assessment, planning and restoration programs work with stakeholders to assess watershed water quality throughout Texas and then develop plans to improve and protect water quality in the watersheds. These watershed projects frequently use a holistic, stakeholder-driven approach to develop watershed protection plans to accomplish the water quality goals of the watershed.

Water Sustainability and Drought Management
Our water sustainability and drought management programs concentrate on increasing available water, meeting present and future water demands and creating new sources of water through agricultural and urban water research and educational outreach.

Water Resources Training and Education
Our Water Resources Training Program markets and administers short courses on diverse water-related topics. The training courses provide water resources professionals with intensive, hands-on instruction on the latest technologies and products of university research.

Other education programs work with stakeholders to increase knowledge and understanding on critical water quality and water quantity issues in Texas.

Investing in the future, TWRI also awards funds to graduate students studying water resources at Texas universities through the U.S. Geological Survey research grants and to Texas A&M University graduate students through the W.G. Mills Scholarship Program.

Texas Water Resources Institute is part of Texas A&M AgriLife Research, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University.

Contact Texas Water Resources Institute

Roel Lopez
Interim Director
1500 Research Parkway A110
2260 TAMU
College Station, Texas  77843-2260
Phone: 979.845.1851
Fax: 979.845.0662


Service Area

Statewide Program in:
  • Texas

Office Locaters

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