Wellesley Conservation Council
By the 1950s Wellesley's population had doubled since the pre-war years and development of previously open spaces was accelerating. The League of Women Voters water resources study in 1957 created an awareness of the need for some sort of organized action for conservation. We learned the meaning of such words as "watershed," "aquifer" and "wetlands" and became aware of the threats to these resources. The realization of a changing Wellesley prompted the desire to organize in support of the environment.

The words "conservation" and "ecology" were not yet part of our common vocabulary when a group of townspeople became concerned about several occurrences around town. The Town was straightening Fuller Brook to prevent flooding along its course, siting the town incinerator on a wetland, and considering a proposal for a parking lot to take the place of Hunnewell Park near the Town Hall. Alarmed over the issues, a group of citizens took action. In April of 1958 they they met with Allen Morgan, Executive Vice-President of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, to learn how the Sudbury Valley Trustees had organized as a private tax-exempt land trust a few years before. A land trust sounded like a good idea for Wellesley too. Out of that meeting came the incorporation of the Wellesley Conservation Council on June 19, 1958.

The founders modeled the organization after the five-year-old Sudbury Valley Trustees and the Weston Forest and Trail Association, which had been successful in promoting conservation. Later, surrounding towns wrould use the by-laws of the Wellesley Conservation Council as a guide in founding their own land trusts.

Contact Wellesley Conservation Council

Ingrid Carls
814 Worcester St
PO Box 81-129
Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts  02481-0001
Phone: 781-237-6125


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